Miami-Dade's #1 club in table count
in 2015 and 2016: THANK YOU!
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786 264-6613

News & Alerts

WBF publishes 2017 Laws

WBF has released a field-usable edition of the 2017 Laws, which all Zones and NBOs must put into effect no later than September 30, 2017. ACBL has not yet announced its date (it will be following the Labor Day regionals if the previous cycle is any guide). Other resources, such as a law-by-law comparison of the 2007 and 2017 texts, are here.

Polish Bridge Union finds improper behavior by Balicki-Żmudziński, but takes no action, citing statute of limitations

The decision is here. Neapolitan Club's previous summary of events through April 2, 2017 is here, and the video referred to in that summary is here.

Bob Rosen's legacy continues

Justin Lall was a member of the six-player team that represented the USA in the World Bridge Games in Wroclaw, Poland, last year. Justin was on Bob's 2005 and 2006 world championship junior teams, and he said of Bob on Bridgewinners.com: He was our junior captain and taught us to play the right way.

December 4, 2015: John Hurd has just become the first player ever successfully to defend his title in the Blue Ribbon Pairs, ACBL's premier pairs event and one of the elite pair events in the world. It is run each year at the Fall NABC. John was on Bob's 2001 and 2005 world championship junior teams.

Read the thoughts of some of Bob's young players and of some prominent figures in the game here.


Here is an excellent convention card editor that lets you keep your card(s) on-line and share them with whom you like (Bridge Winners membership may be required, but is free, and is a good thing anyway)

Some players can manage car → front door → lobby → playing room → director's table → supplies table → starting seat → rest room → seat → nosh table → seat → results screen → lobby → front door → car with no problem, but navigating a Howell traumatizes them — we don't get it

Amazing, isn't it, how people who can hear a cellphone ring across the room in the bottom of somebody's purse can be deaf to a no-new-boards announce­ment twenty feet away that was audible as far down the hall as the rest rooms

A no-play is not a zero — rather, your percentage for the rest of the session is applied to that board (the same as when you have a sitout and others don't) — if you have a no-play, and you add up your board scores, you will notice that your total score is higher than the sum of your board scores, and now you know why

Help keep the game on time: make your opening lead face down (when someone points out that it wasn't your lead, you just put it back in your hand)  —  and do it before entering the contract in the Bridgemate or writing it on your private score — same goes for tabling the dummy — and if you actually look at the score you're accepting, players who see that board later won't have to lose time calling the director to report an obviously wrong result

you should always shuffle your cards before returning them to the board, but please be sure to shuffle if the board was passed out — it is illegal for a player to draw any inference if he takes his cards out of the board and finds them sorted, but not everyone knows that, so help keep those folks from transgressing

Read Kim Hall on basic rules and etiquette

Read Kim Hall on Garbage Stayman

The Multi 2 — an opening bid devised by Terence Reese more than forty years ago to show a weak two in either major (the Acol system dominant in Reese's England used 2-of-a-major openings as sort-of-strong, and that was not about to be revisited), or certain strong hands in some variants — has arrived at the club — "double shows cards", and other actions natural, is the Bridge World Standard defense, but for some other possibilities, you might consider:

Columns worth reading:
Frank Stewart

…and for discussion of all things bridge:
bridgewinners
BBO forums
rec.games.bridge

…and for expert insight into current events:
neapolitanclub



 

I think your website looks great.  —  Ray Spalding, author of ScorePost and BridgeComposer


Never played bridge? Learn online for free!
The Bidding Box's
weekly calendar
next team game:
Sunday, July 30
email us
check out this inter­active double-dummy ana­lyzer and this case study
Bridge World Standard 2017”
the Laws
District 9
Unit 128
nice for post-mortems: get map
Find more about Weather in Pinecrest, FL

June
top 10 MP winners

35.68  Susan Elias
30.67  Leslie Paul
26.83  Karl Perkins
25.55  Kim Hall
23.79  Ana Messiry
23.55  Marc Spellman
22.32  David Rosenblatt
20.38  Donna Penny
20.08  Michelle Mataillet
16.98  Douglas Winship

299'ers

 7.92  Michael Singer
 5.89  Fran Storper
 5.79  Dottie Zammas
 5.58  Barbara Keyes
 4.74  Dolores A. O'Connell
 4.36  Beverly Loftus
 4.24  Camille King
 3.79  Lee Brooke
 3.61  Julie Abolila
 2.92  Anne Marie Brockmann
We are a zero-tol­erance ACBL-af­filiated open dupli­cate bridge club. We run our games with random deals, electronic scoring including view of previous results, display of rankings automatically updated in real time, pre-twinned boards rather than relays, auto­mated round timing, printed hand records with double-dummy contracts, par scores, and statistics on the boards in play, and one-click on-line retrieval of the day's results including, in addition to the above, actual contracts and opening leads and double-dummy opening leads, just minutes after the game. We participate in The Common Game. Open games are stratified at  3000+ / 1000-2999 / 999- , subject to adjustment or to regulations for a particular event. Game times for pairs are Monday through Thursday at 1 PM, Friday at 12:30 PM, and Saturday at 1 PM; team games are held on an irregular schedule on Sundays at 1 PM; please confirm any particular date by checking the weekly calendar. Games are run We have a "299'er" section every Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday afternoon at the same time as the regular game — "real" duplicate but at a relaxed pace — then, at home, amenities as above (you played a subset of the Open section's hands), plus expert commentary on some of the hands. at Temple Beth Am, 5950 North Ken­dall Drive (SW 88th Street), Pinecrest, Florida; and if you're coming by way of Dixie soutbound, you don't have to mess with the Sunset Place traffic. Non-handi­capped parking for bridge players is to the east (left as you enter the campus) of the guard station; you may be towed at your expense without warning if you park anywhere else. Handi­capped parking is marked. from Dixie southbound, turn left on Le Jeune (SW 42nd Av), go around Cocoplum Circle to the second right onto Old Cutler, right on SW 88th St, left on Red (SW 57th Av), right on SW 88th St — here's a map from Dixie & Blue Road The club man­ager is Ces­sy Ru­bin­son. The phone is 786 264-6613. The club offers an array of weekly classes.

For directions, enter your starting address:

for our colleagues at other clubs: from our experiences:

our technology suppliers

our time announcements

There are a number of bridge clocks available (we use and recommend Lorne Anderson's Bridge Timer because of its support for multiple-monitor setups), but the audio files included for announce­ments can leave something to be desired. We offer .WAV files of a “no-new-boards” announce­ment and an “all-move” announce­ment, each rendered in a male and in a female voice (four files total) here. The documen­tation for your clock should explain how to incor­porate these files into your setup.

some operating notes

Here are two documents that we have prepared for internal reference; you are welcome to make what use of them you will (at your own risk, of course). The second document may offer some insight for anyone who, like us, has wondered whether Law 31B can really mean what it says (spoiler alert: it can't). UPDATE: in the 2017 Laws that will go into effect no later than September 30, Law 31B makes sense again.

"Web" movements have been around for some time as a way to allow fields of almost any size to play all the boards in Mitchell-family movements, but the need for two or more board sets made them impractical for most clubs until the advent of dealing machines. ACBL has now liberated the Web movements that were once available only in Tournament mode so clubs can use them too, but ACBLscore's internal Web movements are fatally flawed for club use as the scheduled last round cannot be dropped once the game is underway. We use and recommend this collection of Web movements from club director Tim Hill of Massachusetts, which is vastly more comprehensive in addition to being tolerant of the vicissitudes of club bridge.


 
Pete on directing
— Bridging the Gap

Director's corner  

“[A] good director…cannot himself play in the game and direct well. — Alex Groner, Duplicate Bridge Direction, 1993.

“Directors who do not play, in general, will do a better job. They can be more objective when giving rulings over disputes or infractions of law. Even if no rulings are called for, they can do a better job maintaining the pace of play, moving boards, checking the movement to be sure nothing bad happens, keeping the coffee pot and the cookie plate filled, answering the phone, and doing the myriad of other things a club director needs to do during the game.” — ACBL Club Director's Handbook, p. 19.




Any statements of club policy on this site, and any automated announcements during a game, are to be considered “instructions of the director…to ensure the orderly progress of the game” per Laws 81C1 and 90B8.



"but theyyy're still playing"  

If youuu had started your last board on time as theyyy did, youuu would still be playing too.

"play it out"  

When a claim is questioned, there is no "playing it out"; the claim ended play. If you do not agree with a claim (having given the claimer a reasonable chance to state his line of play or defense), call the director, who will adjudicate the matter. And if your claim is questioned, don't let anyone get away with telling you how to play — something at least one local veteran believes the law allows the non-claiming side to do (and the law did indeed allow that — until it was changed in 1949.) Don't argue with your opponent(s); just call the director.

call me back  

When the director asks you to call him back at the end of the hand if you feel you were damaged by what you called him about in the first place, there is a good reason for his doing that: he may be having to adjust the score if the non-offending side was damaged, but no one can be sure of that until there is an actual result. After the hand, if you think you were damaged, call the director back so he can resolve the matter; if you don't do this, you are saying, in effect, that you were not damaged as things went. That's fine, but the matter is then over.

questions, questions  

When the director comes to your table in a disputed situation, listen to his questions and answer them —  the director is trying to establish the facts while everyone is there and the matter is fresh. If you choose not to cooperate in this, do not expect the director to be sympathetic to new “facts” offered later when the opponents are not there.

"I want to talk to you about ..."  

Fine — unless it's about something that happened during a game and you didn't call the director at the time — if there was no need to involve the director then, there is none now.



conventions policy for our local games

Games with an upper master-point limit may use General Convention Chart methods only, and ACBL regulations as to "hard" HCP limits will be observed. Games with no upper master-point limit may use General Convention Chart and Mid-Chart methods only, with any "hard" HCP limits appearing in ACBL regulations treated as guidelines; where the Mid-Chart document requires pre-alerting, a written description, and copies of ACBL-approved defenses, those provisions are not operative, but provisions concerning referring to notes on counter-methods are operative. The director will print out the applicable defense(s) to such methods from the ACBL defense database on request of any player. A game that is not wholly local, such as a STaC game or an “ACBL-wide” game, is governed by the Conditions of Contest for that game; the director will have a copy of the CoC available for review.

our appeals process

We do not convene a committee. The appellants together make their appeal by (one) email within 24 hours after the posting of the score of the event; the director adjudicates the appeal in a timely manner and notifies all parties by email. The club files a copy of all emails for inspection by anyone interested, whether a party to the appeal or not.

our time policy

A table must not start a new board without director permission once the round clock gets down to 3:00 — Law 17A defines the start of a board, and the club construes that law as coming into operation only after all previous boards have been scored and reported. Violation will result in a procedural penalty on both pairs (Law 90A).

“A timer that counts down the minutes in the round and signals each move can be very helpful. The timer lets the players know how much time they have left in each round and helps keep the game moving.” — ACBL Club Director's Handbook, p. 13.


The Chronicles of Byron (and friends)

 
 

The Hero Returns

 
 

Part the Sixth

 
 

Part the Fifth

 
 

Part the Fourth

 
 

Part the Third

 
 

Part the Second

 
 

Part the First


BRIDGE IN THE FAST LANE — Bob Rosen and Andy O’Grady with help from Mel Colchamiro

THREE KINDS OF SIGNALS — AND GOING TO THE COPA:

  1. ATTITUDE SIGNALS ----- I LIKE THAT SUIT; I DON’T LIKE THAT SUIT.
  2. COUNT SIGNALS ----- I HAVE AN EVEN NUMBEROF CARDS IN A SUIT OR I HAVE AN ODD NUMBEROF CARDS IN A SUIT.
  3. SUIT PREFERENCE SIGNALS ---- I LIKE A HIGHERRANKING SUIT OR I LIKE A LOWER RANKINGSUIT.

SOMETIMES A CARD IS “JUST A CARD” ANDSOMETIMES A CARD IS A SIGNAL. HERE’S HOWYOU CAN TELL THE DIFFERENCE.

A CARD IS A SIGNAL WHEN IT CANNOT AFFECT THE OUTCOME OF THE CURRENT TRICK.

AN EXAMPLE; IF PARTNER LEADS AN ACE[PROMISING THE KING] AND YOU HAVE Q72, YOUSHOULD PLAY THE SEVEN, ENCOURAGING. IT IS ASIGNAL BECAUSE YOUR PLAY CANNOT AFFECT THE OUTCOME OF THE CURRENT TRICK. HERE’SANOTHER EXAMPLE: DECLARER IS DRAWINGTRUMPS, BUT YOU DON’T HAVE ANY MORE ------YOU ARE MAKING A DISCARD. THE CARD YOUPLAY IS A SIGNAL BECAUSE IT CANNOT AFFECTTHE OUTCOME OF THE CURRENT TRICK. A HIGHONE ENCOURAGES PARTNER TO PLAY THE SUITYOU ARE SIGNALING IN, AND A LOW ONEDISCOURAGES.

WHEN ONE OF YOUR OPPONENTS, THE DECLARER, INITIATES A TRICKBY LEADING PROM EITHER THE DECLARER HANDOR THE DUMMY, ANY SIGNALLING IN THAT SUIT BY THEDEFENSE IS A COUNT SIGNAL TELLING PARTNERHOW MANY CARDS YOU HAVE IN THAT SUIT.PLAYING HIGH [THEN LOW THE NEXT TIME]SHOWS AN EVEN NUMBER OF CARDS IN THE SUIT.PLAYING LOW [THEN HIGHER THE NEXT TIME]SHOWS AN ODD NUMBER IN THAT SUIT,USUALLY THREE OR FIVE.

COUNT OR ATTITUDE

SOMETIMES HIGH OR LOW MEANS I LIKE IT ORNOT. SOMETIMES HIGH OR LOW MEANS AN EVEN OR ODD NUMBER OF CARDS.

HOW DO YOU KNOW WHICH KIND OFSIGNAL IS BEING GIVEN WHEN WE FOLLOW SUIT?

GO TO THE COPA -----

COUNT IF THE
OPPONENT LED THE SUIT, BUT IF
PARTNER LED THE SUIT,
ATTITUDE



David Babcock, Coral Gables, Florida, is the proprietor and Webmaster of miamibridge.net . Content is at the sole discretion of the proprietor and no other person or organization has any claim to use of the site for any purpose. Opinions expressed on this site are those of the proprietor unless otherwise attributed. No responsibility is assumed for content of external sites or any consequences of accessing them.